Injuries are rife in powerlifting

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Injuries are rife in powerlifting.

I’m not a clinician so I have no intent to discuss any methods of rehab for any injuries whatsoever, but I would like to shed some light on prevention and how to go about avoiding injury.

As competitive powerlifters, each and every one of us have had our fair share of injuries from our sport. It’s not the powerlifting that has injured us however, it’s not the weights, it’s not the load or the intensity, it is the inability to train intelligently, move well and gain proficiency.

Unfortunately, injury prevention isn’t prioritized in mosts training and its evident by the injury rate of athletes in the sport.

Here are some of my simple tips on how to get your shit together:

1) Learn how to move well

2) Warm up. Too many people seem to be either too good or in too much of a hurry for this commandment. Learn to activate, mobilize, and get your nervous system firing and condition your body for what lies ahead. If the strongest man in the world can spend 20 minutes mobilizing and focusing on activation work, then Karen from accounts can.

3) Stop grinding out ugly reps. The only thing getting stronger on your body is your ego. Scale your weight down, get the movement right.

4) I don’t believe in over training, but I do believe in under recovering. The only thing you are going to get better at when training twice a day 7 days a week, is being average. Your body changes in recovery ­ let nature take its course.

5) Squatting is not bad for your knees, squatting with shit form is bad for your knees, using your girlfriend as a weight on the leg press, balancing on dumbbells and training to failure on every exercise every day is not going to make you better. It’s going to make you break quicker.

6) Fix muscle imbalances, train for structural balance. Don’t neglect certain muscle groups because they are harder to train, or you cant see them. Those simple errors set you up for injury. Train your body as a unit

7) Hire a coach, if you serious about being competitive, if you serious about excelling in your sport, put your goals in the hands of someone who understands human movement, anatomy, mechanics and training for strength. A strong athlete doesn’t make a good coach, a coach who has made others strong timelessly whilst keeping them injury free is what makes a good coach.

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Lil Kimble

Lil Kimble

Owner of OTG ATHLETIC, Precision Nutrition Certified and ISSA Certified Strength & Conditioning Coach. Lil is driven by her pursuit to empower men and women both mentally and physically through strength training.

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